Alex Riggs - Preseason Priorities

Now that the PGA Tour season has officially started its 2012 campaign, you can likely hear your golf clubs whispering “hit me” from their hibernation. If you haven’t already pulled out a couple clubs and made a few swings in the living room, you likely will soon. Your golfing itch needs scratching and the most efficient solution would be to start preparing for the upcoming season. Given that we are allowed to carry 14 clubs in our bags, we should be sure that we know a few things about each of those clubs.

The equipment in your bag should be fit properly to your individual specifications. The golf swing is an extremely dynamic movement involving incredible force development, so you should be confident your clubs fit your swings fingerprint. Today’s advancements in club technology paired with launch monitor technology, enables experts to ensure the clubs in your bag are designed to match your requirements in length, weight, flex, loft and lie angle. With properly fit golf clubs, you will give yourself the greatest opportunity to control the direction and distance of your golf ball.

Each club in your bag should serve a purpose and you should know exactly how far it goes. Launch monitors have given us the knowledge to determine the distances associated with each club in a golfers bag. Occasionally, players have extremely tight distance gaps between some clubs and larger gaps between others. Creating a set composition that keeps your gaps consistent has never been easier given the abundant loft options in the Titleist metal, and Vokey wedges lines. The Titleist SureFit System allows for further customization in the driver, fairway, and hybrid line. We’re seeing more and more golfers choosing to carry additional hybrids or fairway woods rather than long irons with the goal of improving carry distances. The new Vokey SM4 Wedges collection offers a wide array of loft, lie, bounce, and grind options to fit your unique swing. Getting fit for your wedges will allow you to simplify the distance gaps and optimize your wedges to meet the performance you seek. For example, are you a ‘slider sweeper’ or a ‘driver digger’ style of wedge player? That’s a great place to start when determining the ideal wedge bounce for your game.

Given the variety of shots that arise on any given day, it is crucial to know that you are making the best use of your 14 tools.

Titleist has a vast network of trained Canadian PGA Certified Fitting Professionals with the skills necessary to complete a full bag analysis. They are great resources for you to ensure that your clubs are fit properly and gapped effectively to give you the best opportunity to succeed. Whether it is fitting your long game to control your launch angle and spin rates or analyzing your wedges to determine proper distance gaps and bounce options, Titleist Certified Fitting Professionals have the expertise to finely tune your specific club matrix.

Best,

Alex Riggs
Canadian PGA Professionals
TPI Golf Instructor Level III & Junior Coach Level III

After an exciting two weeks of island life on Hawaii, the bags were packed and the tour made its away across the Pacific to sunny California for the start of the inaugural Humana Challenge.

Players rolled in to PGA West in La Quinta, Ca. earlier this week to get in their reps on the range and Team Titleist member Greg Moore was there to catch all of the action.

Check out the slideshow below. And as always, thanks Greg!

Pro V1x loyalist Johnson Wagner had been telling friends and family that he'd win a PGA Tour event early in 2012. It took him just 15 days to make good on that promise.

With renewed confidence (not to mention a new mustache), Wagner rolled his Pro V1x golf ball in for four birdies over the final 12 holes Sunday to capture the Sony Open in Hawaii for his third-career PGA Tour victory.

 "Yeah, I was definitely telling people to expect something early this year, which is a nice feeling," said Wagner, who shot rounds of 68-66-66-67 at Waialae Country Club for a 13-under 267 total and two-shot triumph.

Wagner, 31, credited the success to plain old hard work during the off-season, both on the course and in the gym.

"I'm just going to try to get better every day," said Wagner, who will be soon receiving an invitation to compete in this year's Master Tournament.

"It's a terrible cliché but I'm just going to try to get better and keep working out and keep doing the things I'm doing."

It marked the second consecutive win and a sweep of the "Aloha Swing" for Titleist golf ball players to start the 2012 PGA Tour season, following Titleist Brand Ambassador Steve Stricker's (Pro V1x) three-shot victory last weekend at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions. (Wagner finished T-9 at Kapalua.)

Last season, Titleist Pro V1 and Pro V1x players won 33 of the PGA Tour's 44 events, including Wagner's victory at the Mayakoba Classic.

This week, 99 players at the Sony Open relied on Titleist golf ball for their success, more than seven times the nearest competitor with 13 and more than all competitors combined.

Titleist was also No. 1 in iron sets (37); sand, lob and approach wedges (120); and putters (56).

• CHINA: Zhang Xin Jun (Pro V1x) earned his first career win at the China PGA Tour's Hainan event, topping a leader board the featured eight Titleist golf ball players in the top 10.

Zhang closed in 3-under 69 for a 17-under 271 total, two shots ahead of Lee Joung Wook (Pro V1x). Li Hao Tong (Pro V1x) and Su Dong (Pro V1x) tied for third place, another two shots back.

A total of 88 players trusted Titleist Pro V1 and Pro V1x golf balls in the event, nearly nine times the nearest competitor with 10 and more than all other golf ball combined. Titleist was also first in sand, lob and approach wedges (120).

• EUROPEAN TOUR: At the Joburg Open, 148 players teed up Titleist golf balls, 120 more than the nearest competitor with 28 and more than all competitors combined. Titleist was also first in iron sets (61); and wedges (206).

It's pretty easy to sum up Sony Open week at Waialae Country Club: Great golf, and even better views.

(Or is it the other way around?)

For Team Titleist, it's definitely about giving a first "Aloha!" of 2012 to many of our Titleist Brand Ambassadors and golf ball loyalists, including several of the rookies making their debuts as full-time PGA Tour members (i.e., Bud Cauley, Seung-yul Noh and Erik Compton).

A total of 99 players in the field this week are playing Titleist golf balls, more than seven times the nearest competitor with 13 and more than all competitors combined. Titleist is also No. 1 in iron sets (37); sand, lob and approach wedges (120); and putters (56).

In the slideshow below, we're taking a closer look at some of the Titleist equipment in this week's field, including more pics of the new Scotty Cameron Select line due out this spring.

(Also be sure to check out this week's Scotty Cameron Tour Slideshow on ScottyCameron.com.)

Enjoy!

  

What's in Your Ball Pocket?

When Steve Stricker reaches into the ball pocket on his golf bag, he knows exactly what he's getting: A Titleist Pro V1x golf ball. Every time.

For Adam Scott, it's always a Titleist Pro V1. Same for K.J. Choi. For Rory McIlroy? Pro V1x, every time.

Top amateur golfers subscribe to the same philosophy, choosing to play the same brand and model golf ball every time they play or practice, whether it's on the course, a practice green or in a short-game area.

The reason is simple: Changing the golf ball changes every shot.

And if you want to shoot lower scores and consistently play your best golf, one of the first steps is knowing what to expect out of your golf ball on each and every swing.

 What does your golf ball pocket look like?

"Consistency starts with knowing how the golf ball is going to perform," says Bill Morgan, Senior Vice President of Titleist Golf Ball R&D.

"We play with the same driver, the same irons, the same putter during the course of the round, but a lot of golfers think nothing of pulling out a different golf ball than what they started with and playing their next shot with it. .... Unless you're prepared for that and skilled enough to change your swing, you're going to get a different result."

Through extensive player and robot testing, Morgan says, the R&D team has found "dramatic differences in golf ball performance on shots into the green from brand to brand to brand."

For example, say you're hitting a short iron into a green. What's the goal? Hitting it as close to the pin as possible, if not in the hole. The closer you hit it to the pin, the better your chances of making the putt and lowering your score.

Executing that shot consistently not only requires a good swing, but knowing how your golf ball is going to react when it hits the putting surface.

"Does it hit and stop? Does it bounce a couple times before checking up? That sort of reliance and that confidence in your golf ball can really start to alter the rest of your game," says Titleist Golf Ball Fitter Michael Collins.

Accordingly, here are a couple easy New Year's resolutions you can add to your list, courtesy of Mike Gibson, Manager of Titleist Golf Ball Fitting.

"First, make sure you have been properly fit for the best golf for your game," he says. "Second, stick to that golf ball for the season. For casual rounds and tournament rounds. On the practice green before a round. Even if you're just hitting pitches in your backyard."

Titleist's green-to-tee ball fitting methodology is based on the fact that most scoring opportunities are created by shots into the target, and improving your game in those areas will have the most game-changing affects.

"As you learn how your golf ball performs in various situations, you also gain the confidence necessary to hit more greens and get the ball closer to the pin," Gibson says. "Whether you're a tour pro or a 15-handicap, you're going to make shorter putts more often. Who doesn't want to make more putts?"

Step one: Taking a look in your golf ball pocket.

To begin the Titleist Performance Golf Ball Fitting process yourself, click here.

1
2
3 4