The Florida Swing continues this week with Stop No. 3 in the Sunshine State: The Transitions Championship.

The field is filled with Titleist players, including last year's winner, Titleist Brand Ambassador Gary Woodland and PGA Tour rookie and Titleist Brand Ambassador Bud Cauley (pictured below).

 In total, 91 players are trusting Titleist Pro V1 and Pro V1x golf balls for their success, this week at Innisbrook's Copperheard Course, more than four times the nearest competitor with 22 and more than all other golf balls combined. Titleist is also No. 1 in sand, lob and approach wedges (122); and putters (55).

You can check out all of our pics from this week's practice rounds in the slideshow below (and find out exactly how Bud marks his Titleist Pro V1x).

Three weeks and counting until The Masters!

TITLEIST INTRODUCES SCOTTY CAMERON SELECT PUTTER FAMILY
Brand New Line Features Modern Blades, Mallets, Mid and Long Options
in a Tour-Validated Black Mist Finish


Fairhaven, MA (March 14, 2012) – Trusted by more players on the PGA TOUR since 1997 and counting, Scotty Cameron Fine Milled putters are designed and built with craftsmanship and performance in mind.  With his experience and innovative research from the Cameron Putter Studio in California, Scotty Cameron creates modern, yet timeless, putters to satisfy the best players in the world, as well as serious golfers with preferences for the highest quality and performance.

The brand new Scotty Cameron by Titleist Select line of putters is the culmination of Cameron’s Putter Studio research, combined with his desire to design and build the best putters in the world.  The new family includes five modern blade models (Newport, Newport 1.5, Newport 2, Notchback, Newport 2.6), two mallets (GoLo, GoLo S), three mid lengths (Newport Two Mid, GoLo Mid, GoLo S Mid), and two long options (Big Sur, Big Sur S).  

The new Select putters feature a Deep Milled face that contributes to a softer feel and sound, as well as elegantly refined shapes and a Tour-validated Black Mist finish.  All are precision milled from soft, 303 stainless steel, with the exception being the Big Sur models that feature high grade milled aluminum heads.

“My ultimate goal when designing and building a putter is to provide the golfer pure putting confidence,” said Master Putter Craftsman Scotty Cameron.  “Whether it is for the best players in the world or golfers who aspire to play their best, the performance and preference options available in the new Cameron Select line are my deepest yet.  These putters have all been tour-validated, developed and refined through product and player research conducted at our state-of-the-art Cameron Putter Studio and on practice greens around the world.”

With the Select family, Cameron has taken “visual flow” to a new level.  When looking down at the putter in the address position, Cameron has designed the surfaces in the head to flow naturally into the ground.  The Select weighting system provides modern balance and stability and every Select putter is outfitted with a stepless steel shaft for a clean, unimpaired visual at address.  Select putters can be lie adjusted +/- 2 degrees off the standard 71 degrees and loft adjusted +/- 1 degree from the standard 4 degrees for even greater fine-tuning. 

The conventional models - the new Cameron Select Newport, Newport 1.5, Newport 2, Notchback and Newport 2.6 putters - replace the Studio Select line.  The head features a rich, dark, glare free Black Mist finish with red dot graphics and red dot weights in the sole, and is covered with a new Cameron Select headcover.  The grip is a new Select black with a red dancing Cameron logo.  All standard right hand models are available in 33, 34 and 35 inch lengths, as well as 34H and 35H custom heavier weight configurations.

The GoLo Mallets and GoLo Mids replace the Studio Select Kombi Mallet and Kombi Mid lines.   The GoLo (single bend shaft) and GoLo S (straight shaft) feature an elegant rounded profile with Select weighting technology.  The slightly asymmetric back profile, contained cavity lines and pulled in heel encourage a flowing stroke along the ideal arc.  The bottom sole plate with internal rubber ring produces a great sound.  Two neck configurations allow the golfer to choose his preferred set up appearance and dynamic feel. 
The stock conventional length mallets are available in 33, 34 and 35 inches as well as 34H and 35H custom heavier weight configurations.  The Newport Two Mid, GoLo Mid and GoLo S Mid come in a standard length of 43” with custom lengths of 40-46” available.

The Select Big Sur and Big Sur S replace the Studio Select Kombi Long line in the Cameron putter family.  Both putters are constructed from aluminum, and feature a stainless steel center sole weight bar and triangulated stainless weights that provide exceptional balance.  They each feature a Cameron one-piece black grip, a Tour Black Mist plated finish, cherry dot graphics, cherry dot weights in the sole and a new Select Big Sur headcover.  The Big Sur and Big Sur S Long putters are available with a standard length of 49” and a lie angle of 79°, with lengths of 46-52” available through custom order.
 
In combination, all these different options allow golfers to choose a Cameron Select putter with the appearance they prefer, the length and weight they need, and a neck configuration that provides the proper amount of toe flow during the stroke.

2012 CAMERON SELECT MODEL DESCRIPTIONS

MODERN BLADES


 Newport:  A soft, modern blade with a high toe profile that aids in correct setup at address. A plumbing neck provides a full shaft of offset and medium toe flow.  Available in right hand only.

Newport 1.5:  A soft modern blade with a high toe profile featuring a black-on-black milled sightline in the flange and a short flare neck for added toe flow.  Available in right hand only.

Newport 2: A crisp, modern blade with a high toe profile, black-on-black milled sightline in the flange and a plumbing neck that provides a full shaft of offset and medium toe flow.  Available in right and left hand.

Notchback:  A crisp mid blade with a high toe profile, notched back flange with a black-on-black milled sightline and an elegant single bend shaft that provides 3/4 shaft of offset and near minimum toe flow.  Available in right hand only.

Newport 2.6:  A crisp modern blade with a high toe profile, black-on-black milled sightline in the flange and a zero-offset straight shaft positioned one shaft back from center.   The Newport 2.6 features a slightly thicker topline and minimum toe flow.  Available in right hand only.

MALLETS


 GoLo Mallet:   Elegant, rounded mallet with a slightly asymmetric D-shaped back flange with contained cavity lines and a pulled in heel that encourages a flowing stroke along the ideal arc.  A single bend shaft provides 3/4 shaft of offset.  Available in right and left hand.

GoLo S Mallet: Elegant, rounded mallet with a slightly asymmetric D-shaped back flange with contained cavity lines and a pulled in heel that encourages a flowing stroke along the ideal arc.  A zero-offset straight shaft positioned one shaft back from center.  Available in right hand only.

 

MID LENGTHS


Newport 2 Mid: Refined crisp, modern blade for heel-toe blade enthusiasts seeking a mid-length option.  Precisely weighted and balanced for mid lengths.  Available in right hand only.

GoLo Mid: Elegant, rounded mallet with a slightly asymmetric D-shaped back flange precisely weighted and balanced for mallet enthusiasts seeking a mid-length option.  Features a single bend shaft that provides 3/4 shaft of offset.

GoLo Mid S: Elegant, rounded mallet with a slightly asymmetric D-shaped back flange precisely weighted and balanced for mallet enthusiasts seeking a mid-length option. Features a zero-offset straight shaft positioned one shaft back from center.

 

LONG


 The Big Sur is a sleek but full mallet matched to a double bend shaft that provides a full shaft of offset, and is available in right and left hand.

The Big Sur S is a sleek but full mallet matched to a zero-offset straight shaft positioned one shaft back from center.  It is available in right hand only.

 

ON TOUR:  Every year since 1997, Scotty Cameron putters have been the choice of more players and more champions on the PGA Tour than any other brand.  On the 2011 PGA TOUR, players trusted Scotty Cameron putters for a Tour-leading 18 victories, include first-time PGA Tour champions Chris Kirk, Scott Stallings, Scott Piercy and Kevin Na who trusted Cameron putters to win at the Viking Classic, Greenbrier Classic, Reno-Tahoe Open and the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children, respectively.  Nick Watney trusted his Scotty Cameron putter to win twice in 2011, at the WGC – Cadillac Championship and the AT&T National.  Rory McIlroy turned in a performance for the ages with his Cameron putter, lapping the field en route to his first major title at the U.S. Open.  With additional wins across seven different worldwide professional golf tours in 2011, including the 140th Open Championship, Scotty Cameron loyalists accumulated 58 victories.

PRICE AND AVAILABILITY:  All conventional Scotty Cameron Select and Select GoLo putters begin shipping to golf shops on April 1, 2012, while the Select Mid and Long putters will be available beginning May 1, 2012.  The new Cameron Select putters carry a MSRP of $375.

 

 IMAGES AND INFORMATION: To download hi-res photography of to obtain additional information on the new Scotty Cameron Select putters, please click the image to the left, or contact Joe Gomes, Director of Communications, Acushnet Company (508.979.3211).  Titleist and FootJoy comprise the major golf brands of the Acushnet Company.

 

 

 

 


For full descriptions of product features and benefits, visit http://www.titleist.com/golf-clubs/putters/cameron-select.aspx

Further customization of any Cameron putter is available through Scotty’s Custom Shop at www.scottycameron.com.

I have yet to meet someone without a desire to hit it further with more accuracy. It is fair to say that having shorter approach shots from the middle of the fairway is a common goal for all. As we see the players on the professional tours doing it every week, we often question what they do that is so different. In order to understand the result of their incredible skill, it is crucial to understand the cause... Impact!

Believe it or not, the ball doesn’t care about what logos are on your sleeve or whether you are “working on your swing”. The ball is only concerned about how the head of the golf club impacts it. This “collision” between the ball and the club involves several important parameters. In this article, I will go over parameters that directly relate the events at impact to the overall flight of the ball. For clarity purposes, I will use the driver as our reference club.

The first parameter is called Angle of Attack. Angle of Attack is the degree to which the club head is either ascending or descending into the golf ball at impact. As we are swinging the club on an arc, it is possible to hit the ball on the downward phase, the low point (bottom of arc), or upward phase. Currently, the PGA average for Angle of Attack with the driver is negative 1.3 degrees, while the LPGA average is positive 3 degrees. Studies show that increasing your Angle of Attack in a positive direction can have a noticeable effect on improving your overall distance. By catching the ball more on the upswing it is possible to improve distance by increasing the launch angle and decreasing the amount of back spin.



Angle of Attack is tied in very closely with a parameter called Dynamic Loft. Dynamic Loft is the actual loft of the golf club at impact. As the club head travels into the golf ball, the true loft it possesses is often different to the static loft it has if measured outside of the swing. One thing experienced players do very well with the driver is keep their Dynamic Loft within a few degrees of their clubs true loft. Amateurs are often guilty of attempting to lift the ball into the air, therefore Dynamic Loft becomes much higher than the static loft. By subtracting your Angle of Attack from your Dynamic Loft, you get something called Spin Loft. It is our goal to keep Spin Loft as low as possible because it relates directly with the spin of the golf ball.

The next two parameters I will touch on are Face Angle and Club Path. Face Angle is the direction the contact point of the face is pointing in relation to the target at the point of impact. Club Path is the direction the center of mass of the club head is moving in relation to the target at impact. We know from launch monitors that 85% of the golf balls initial launch direction is related to Face Angle. Whether the golf ball curves from that starting position is largely due to Club Path. If both of these parameters are directed towards the target through impact, your chances of hitting your target are almost perfect. The greater the difference between these two parameters, the more the ball will curve. If your goal as a player is to hit straight shots, you will want to keep these two numbers as close as possible.

The next parameter I will focus on is Clubhead Speed. Clubhead Speed is the speed at which the clubhead is moving at impact. Clubhead Speed is based around power as well as efficiency. Genetics play a role, however Clubhead Speed can often be improved through proper instruction and physical training. The greater speed the clubhead is carrying through impact, the greater potential for higher Ball Speed. Ball Speed is the speed the ball initially possesses as it leaves the club head and is the number that really matters in the overall results. The other factor in Ball Speed, is the location of contact. In order to maximize ones Ball Speed for their given Clubhead Speed, solid contact must be achieved.

Lastly, when talking about contact, I find it essential to bring up Gear Effect. Gear Effect relates to the physical effect the golf club has on the golf ball with off-center hits. Due to the position of the center of mass within the clubhead, shots that are contacted directionally away from this point will have some degree of Gear Effect. The more a shot is contacted off the toe of the club, the more the ball will want to curve in a draw pattern. The more a shot is contacted off the heal, the more the ball will want to curve in a fade pattern. The reason driver faces are not perfectly straight is in attempt to counter act some of the Gear Effect. In order to eliminate the potential for unwanted curvature, it is important to direct your contact point as close to the center of the face as possible.

The purpose of this article was to break down the important aspects of what goes on at the point of impact and how this relates to where the ball travels. Understanding these principles can help offer clarity to explaining the differences between your perfect shots and your not-so-perfect shots.

For an interesting article on strength and speed development, check out what Rory McIlroy, the new world #1, is doing while he is away from the course.

http://news.menshealth.com/rory-mcilroy-honda-classic/2012/03/05/

As always, feel free to post any and all questions to the comments section below or in the Team Titleist discussion threads.

Regards,

Alex Riggs
Canadian PGA Professionals
TPI Golf Instructor Level III & Junior Coach Level III

@RiggsGolf

Many of the world's best golfers are in Miami this week for the WGC-Cadillac Championship, the beginning of an unofficial five-week march to the Masters. That includes Titleist Brand Ambassador Adam Scott (pictured below), who spent the practice days working on controlling his Pro V1 golf ball in Doral's blustery conditions.

 Adam is one of 41 Titleist golf balls players in the field this week, more than four times the nearest competitor with 10 and more than all competitors combined. Titleist is also first in iron sets (18); and sand, lob and approach wedges (62).

Check out all of Team Titleist's pics from the practice days, including a closer at some of the Titleist equipment being used to battle The Blue Monster this week, in the slideshow below.

  

Video: Practice Under Pressure



Team Titleist member Steve B. recently submitted the following question: "I'm a scratch player. I would like to know your thoughts on approaching a lower score? Not just making more birdies, but the whole game."

Titleist Brand Ambassador Greg Chalmers says to "practice how you're going to play under pressure as much as possible."

Check out Greg's full answer in the above video.

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