whats the best combination of wedges to purchase

Hi Robin, I like what Craig says, I also switch clubs around. I carry ap1 pw 46 and Vokey gw 50, sw 54 and lw58 but I have to drop my 3 hybrid 909 19 to carry 4 wedges. If I need the 3 hybrid I'll drop 1 wedge ussuallt the 58 but course will dictate, I have found this will cost me in strokes around green or wet heavy bunkers. I am currently looking at a new 4hybrid and 5 wood combo to not have to carry the 3 hybrid and keep the 4 wedges. Try them out and find your gaps and don't forget the bounce, I have an 11 on my 54 and an 8 on my 58 so I can open it up.

David

Fred C
Several years ago, I settled on 52 degree and 58 degree wedges to go with my 46 degree PW. I chose the 58 with 4 degree bounce because I can open it lot and make it act like a 60+ loft or, shut it down a bit and make it work like a 56 degree. It's worked well, FOR ME. You should try out different wedges to see what works best for YOU. Not only lofts, but bounce settings and flange widths.

Exact same thing for me. The key for me was to have consistent loft differences from wedge to wedge. Everything else is practice.

I spent a lot of time in the short game practice area and really tried to figure out distances on full, 9 o clock and 7 o clock shots, and starting to work on different types of shots, flop, hinge and hold, pitch, chip. Not to say I'm any good, just that I'm practicing and getting better :)

I got a set of 755 forged irons so I am playing with the 9 and PW (47) tomorrow, along with the 52-12 and 60-10.

Hey Robin,

A lot of the suggestions make a great deal of sense.  I feel that the most important part is how you feel about your swing and game.  I carry an AP 1 PW (45degrees), an AP 1 GW (50 degrees) and a Vokey SM4 SW (56degrees).  I've tried the 4 wedge system (45,50,54,58) in the past, but found that some of the situations I was in (30-40 yd pitches) led me to wonder which club to use.  Both the 54 and 58 could get the ball to the pin, but did I want to fly it there or maybe have a little more run on the shot?  I found that I was not certain when I was over the ball, and that indecision usually led to a bad result. So I went back to the 3 wedge set-up and took some of the confusion out of the mix.  My suggestion is try them all and settle on the ones that work the best for you most of the time.  If you are like me, you don't have a lot of money to have a bunch of wedges in the house to switch out based on the course you're playing, so do the set-up for where you play most often and do your best on the other courses.  One suggestion, I have run across some golf stores that have demo clubs that they would rent for a week or so in order to let the customer try them somewhat before buying them.  You might ask around your area or maybe the pro at the course you play.  If you're a regular the pro might be more willing to let you borrow something to try.  Fairways and greens.

  Mark F

go to the bob vokey wedge fitting page on titleist.com and it will give you all the steps to figure out you wedge set up.

Mark F

Hey Robin,

A lot of the suggestions make a great deal of sense.  I feel that the most important part is how you feel about your swing and game.  I carry an AP 1 PW (45degrees), an AP 1 GW (50 degrees) and a Vokey SM4 SW (56degrees).  I've tried the 4 wedge system (45,50,54,58) in the past, but found that some of the situations I was in (30-40 yd pitches) led me to wonder which club to use.  Both the 54 and 58 could get the ball to the pin, but did I want to fly it there or maybe have a little more run on the shot?  I found that I was not certain when I was over the ball, and that indecision usually led to a bad result. So I went back to the 3 wedge set-up and took some of the confusion out of the mix.  My suggestion is try them all and settle on the ones that work the best for you most of the time.  If you are like me, you don't have a lot of money to have a bunch of wedges in the house to switch out based on the course you're playing, so do the set-up for where you play most often and do your best on the other courses.  One suggestion, I have run across some golf stores that have demo clubs that they would rent for a week or so in order to let the customer try them somewhat before buying them.  You might ask around your area or maybe the pro at the course you play.  If you're a regular the pro might be more willing to let you borrow something to try.  Fairways and greens.

  Mark F

The AP1 PW, SM4 52-12 and 60-10 work like a charm.  I have the AP1 PW bent to 46 and the other two 1* strong.  When I had the 4 wedge setup (SM c-c 50-08 and 54-14 before going to the SM4), sometimes it was a bit of confusion on choosing one or the other.  I also had 50-55-60-64 in 2006 and ended up replacing the 55 and 60 with a 258-12.   I even had a 5 wedge setup last year (PW-50-54-58-62) and that got very confusing with the lob wedges because each one had limited use.  With fewer wedges it is easier to master each one.

It all depends on the loft of your pitching wedge (PW) as most everyone mentioned.  I have a 47 degree PW, so I ended up buying a 52 degree Gap Wedge, and 56 degree sand wedge. 

You would want your wedges to have anywhere between 4-5 degrees of loft within each other to fill in those "gaps" of yardage.  I'm still trying to figure out whether I want to get a 60 degree lob wedge right now instead of just opening up my 56 degree more, or just go with a longer fairway wood since I do have room for one more club in my bag.

The loft choice of your wedge is first based off the loft of your pitching wedge.  How big of a degree gap that you use is based on your speed and shot preference.  You can see the Vokey Wedge Recommendation page for bounce options.

Slower speeds will see less of a difference is degree changes and therefore could use a 6 degree gap so that your yardage gaps stay the same (10-12 yards).

If a high ball speed player and distance control is an issue, I would recommend a 4 wedge system with 4 degree gaps.

If you have the ability to take yardage off your wedge, keep a high trajectory consider just 3 wedges with no more than 6 degree gaps.

Hope this helps.  You can always see your local PGA Professional and Titleist Fitter in your area to go thru a wedge fitting.

KL

Kevin L

The loft choice of your wedge is first based off the loft of your pitching wedge.  How big of a degree gap that you use is based on your speed and shot preference.  You can see the Vokey Wedge Recommendation page for bounce options.

Slower speeds will see less of a difference is degree changes and therefore could use a 6 degree gap so that your yardage gaps stay the same (10-12 yards).

If a high ball speed player and distance control is an issue, I would recommend a 4 wedge system with 4 degree gaps.

If you have the ability to take yardage off your wedge, keep a high trajectory consider just 3 wedges with no more than 6 degree gaps.

Hope this helps.  You can always see your local PGA Professional and Titleist Fitter in your area to go thru a wedge fitting.

KL

Agree with Kevin.  I have a slower swing speed than I used to and I find it easier to control distance by choking down.  Someone with a 110+ mph swing speed would probably fall on his keyster trying to hit a fully choked swing.  

I also like the simplicity of a 3 wedge system.  I learned how to play golf when pitching wedges were 50-52* and sand wedges were 58*.