Hit up or down on the driver?

Here is a question many people can't answer, Do you hit up on the golf ball or Down with the driver? I have heard the best way to get the most distance is to hit the ball on the up swing but then again, some of the best drivers of the golf ball hit down on the driver. What is your opinion?

Hitting up, but not the way I see a lot of people trying to hit it. When I say hit up, I mean hit the ball just past the bottom of the swing. It is more like hitting it flat but with your head behind the ball. I see too many people teeing the ball way too high and swinging up at the ball. I tee the ball pretty low for my driver, only about a quarter of the ball above the driver face. This flat part of my swing when I contact the ball is where I get my distance from. Keep your head behind the ball though and transfer your weight forward or else you will hit pull hooking worm burners.

I've been told to hit up on the ball with a driver to maximize hang time and distance.  In your ready position and tilted away from the target line, your club head is going to look a little closed.  If the club is open you may slice your ball.   And, if there is wind against you just put the ball a little further back in your stance to hit it lower.  In reality, it's whatever works for your swing...I think anyways.

I have a question regarding spin...how does your spin numbers affect distance and what is the spin number you want for a 85 MPH swing speed, and lastly how do you achieve that spin rate?


You hit the ball at the very beginning of the upswing, hence the ball placement parallel with your left foot. Think of a hula hoop. For irons, the contact is made at the bottom of the swing (bottom of the loop). The driver contact is made just after the bottom of the swing (3 or so inches past the bottom of the hula hoop).

The best driver results would come from swings which are level with a slightly ascending (upward) angle for optimum launch. Most pros are this type of swing, and many amatuers, but most have a descending  (downward) angle which decreases launcangle and increases spin.

808HACKER

I've been told to hit up on the ball with a driver to maximize hang time and distance.  In your ready position and tilted away from the target line, your club head is going to look a little closed.  If the club is open you may slice your ball.   And, if there is wind against you just put the ball a little further back in your stance to hit it lower.  In reality, it's whatever works for your swing...I think anyways.

I have a question regarding spin...how does your spin numbers affect distance and what is the spin number you want for a 85 MPH swing speed, and lastly how do you achieve that spin rate?


Well a shot with the driver generally results in 2,000 to 4,000 rpm of spin. I believe that too much spin causes a soaring, " ballooning " ball flight that cuts down on distance with lack of roll after landing. Too little spin will kill the ball's ability to stay in the air, resulting in a short carry. It's important to note that, all other things being equal, the faster a players swing speed, the more backspin created. This is one of the reasons many people play a golf ball that spins less off of the tee. Although golf swings below 90 mph won't see a dramatic increase in distance with a low spin golf ball, the reduced spin will help to lessen severity of slices and hooks. Hope this helps.

You never hit down on a drive or fairway wood. I used to hit down on those clubs and that would result in me topping the ball each time. Swing through the ball and sort up an up ward fashion to get the ball up in the air and solid contact.

Connor I heard the same about hitting down on the driver but, I never see any pro play the ball back in there stance to confirm this...They also seem to have there head behind the ball at impact ...I've seen them play it back to hit a stinger but not a normal drive..I alway's hit the ball on the upswing unless I rotate wrong...

Thanks for the advise Connor :)

Given the shaft of the driver is bowed away from the target at impact, the club will hit the ball on an upswing on its own. Just try to swing level and hit the ball solid and you will get maximum distance..

There has been a lot of good advice in this thread. and a lot of good ways to describe what your looking for. i like the hula hoop reference. also the point of stressing its just barely on the up swing. there was some good advice on how high to tee the ball. a lot of this is probably what you would hear from a PGA instructor. I recommend getting with the course pro and have him look at your swing and see if you actually do need any help in this area.

I'm 5' 7" and 48 and can still hit some bombs.  For the last 20 years its been tee it up as high as possible and grip it and rip it.  One of the biggest mistakes (IMO) golfers make is resting the driver on the ground; when you do that you take it back in one plane and then swing at the ball in another. Instead, Hover the Driver behind the ball and then take it back and swing through the ball - don't swing up - place the ball slightly more forward allowing you to hit the ball on the slight rise of the 'hula hoop.' This creates top spin which allows the ball to release more on landing improving distance.  Also means your worm-burners will travel further. 

I'm the type that figures accuracy is the most valuable factor in driving so that being said the ball in a neutral position (low point of arc) is the starting point IMHO.  I work it slightly forward depending on fairway but accuracy is primary focus.  (I hit my drives typically 285 range)  When wind is a factor if it's coming from behind I op for a little more hieght and use the 3 wood so wind can add to the carry.

I was always told it's UP. Make contact with the ball as the clubface starts on the upside of the swing just passed the middle. I think LOL

Trackman is really clear on this.  The  results from measuring touring pros is that they swing up 4-5 degrees and swing inside out.  The irons, on the other hand, are exactly the opposite.  They swing down and swing outside in.  Quite different than expected.  Empirical Trackman analysis of face angle and path also verifies that this is the way to hit the ball straight.

Irons, for Trackman, means fairway woods, hybrids, irons, and wedges.   Although the outside to in path gets closer to straight when the loft increases.  No pro hits up on fairway woods unless they want to hit a tremendous hook. 

Next time you watch "On the Range", watch how the pro downswing for irons are always outside the backswing. They are practicing coming slightly over the top and left of the target line.

I'm sure the scientists at Titleist can verify this information.