Need some tips on driving

When I hit an iron my ball doesn't slice at all. On the other hand, when I drive the ball it constantly ends up in the rough. What are some things I can try to help my rotation and/or swing?

Steven A

When I hit an iron my ball doesn't slice at all. On the other hand, when I drive the ball it constantly ends up in the rough. What are some things I can try to help my rotation and/or swing?

If you are slicing your driver here are a few key things to check. First, assuming you are right handed, make sure you can see 2 to 3 knuckles on your left hand when you address the ball and the V between your left thumb and fore finger point somewhere between your chin and right shoulder. Make sure your V on your right hand is pointing at your right shoulder. A weak grip (no knuckles showing on your left hand)will let the club face open at impact resulting in a slice. On the practice range lay a club or a alignment stick down a foot behind the ball on the target line. Lay another club parallel to the first one beside your right foot. On your back swing when the driver shaft gets parallel to the ground it should be in line with the alignment stick that is behind your right foot. If you take the driver back to far to the inside you will have a tendency to come back down over the top and hit the ball from the outside in. Lay the driver head cover just on the right side of the stick that is behind the ball and move it up where it is a inch or two behind the ball. If you are coming down from the outside you will hit the head cover. Rotate around your spine and do not sway on your back swing. You can practice this feeling by putting a pillow between your head and a wall inside your home, take your address position and crisscross your arms where your right hand touches your left shoulder and your left hand touches your right shoulder and you rotate your body as you would in your backswing. The driver produces much more side spin on the ball than your short to mid irons and that is why you do not slice much with your irons. The driver is the most unforgiving club in your bag. Try the above and hopefully you will start stripping it down the fairway.

That sounds like really good advice. I have tried many things to get rid of my slice. some thing work for part of a round but the slice always comes back. I was reading this article by Hank Haney about a simple drill to get the club on plane and inside out. I haven't had a chance go through the motions because of the weather but Ill be hitting the range next week. 

something i've seen a lot of people do is they forward press the driver with out realizing it. the ball should be teed up close to your lead foots big toe. when you address the ball the shaft almost look like its leaning away from the ball. this is because your hands should be straight down in front of you. i like to think of it as the grip should be pointing at your belt buckle. once you have this set up then grip the club. you'll find out that you might sub concisely return your hands to this position at impact thus helping you to get the club face right at impact. at least this has worked for me. 

cheers greens and fairways to all. 

Simba

Steven,

The fact that you are slicing the least-lofted club in your bag is in my opinion no coincidence!  I have found that when a golfer tries to help the ball in the air, he usually ends up with a reverse-pivot (shifting to your right foot on the downswing), which often produces a very ugly slice.  A simple fix: Shift your weight 70-80 percent to your right foot on the backswing, and then shift 90 percent of your weight to your left foot on the downswing.  You should always be able to finish in balance on your left foot with your belt buckle more or less pointed at your target.  Higher handicapped golfers often have a hard time trusting the loft of their clubs, but with sufficient power, the ball will go up!  There are many things you can do to get the ball airborne; just make sure it's not a reverse-pivot!!

Hope this helps,

GM