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Best clubs for beginnners.

AlekJ

I have been playing golf for about 6 months and I love it. I have a membership at my local golf club and I go all the time. I am beginning to get more serious about playing. I have had the same clubs for a while and they are cheap clubs I got from my parents attic. Does anyone have suggestions on what clubs would be good for me? Thank You.

13 Replies

  1. Eric C

    I have only been serious myself for about 4 years. I have the AP1 714 irons and Vokey SM5 wedges and am very happy. They are forgiving, accurate, and repeatable. I play TM woods but I am going to be fit for 915 woods soon. Be sure to get fit and don't buy the hype of distance. You will be happier knowing that this club and ball goes this far for ME. If someone else uses a 9 iron and I use a 6 iron for the same distance, it is the SAME distance. Best advice I ever got, hope it helps, good luck.
  2. Aaron W

    AP1's are probably a good place to start.  If you feel comfortable with your swing at all I would encourage you to go through a fitting process to make sure that the shafts, lengths, lofts, and lies are all suited for your game.  

  3. Don O

    Aaron W

    AP1's are probably a good place to start.  If you feel comfortable with your swing at all I would encourage you to go through a fitting process to make sure that the shafts, lengths, lofts, and lies are all suited for your game.  

    To add on top of Aaron's suggestion, a local club, maybe your own, that does fittings with Titleist will have a fitter that can recommend clubs and/or some swing changes even prior to getting fit. Titleist clubs are price-competitive between retailers and small pro shops. Within the multitude of available stock shafts, a set customized for you costs no more than off the rack. New equipment from any vendor is a serious purchase, so take the time to learn how to get the most benefit from a set tailored to you. I'm a border line high handicapper but all but 2 hybrids were customized for me. It's not just for the really good players.
  4. Speedy

    I agree AP1s would probably be best BUT I would HIGHLY recommend getting fitted by a certified Titleist fitter...  You will definitely learn a lot more from them than just going to a regular golf shop, IMO... 

    That's about the best advice i can give you if you're serious about picking up a sweet set of APs..  

    Best of luck and keep us posted!

  5. PK

    Alek,

    I agree with most of the posts above. If you are very serious about the game, have good fundamentals and pretty consistent hitting the ball, I would seriously consider going to get fit at a full fledged custom fitter like Cool Clubs or a certified Titleist fitter. Especially with a beginner being exposed to as many brands and shaft combinations possible may be overwhelming but usually you walk away with no buyers remorse. The fitters at these places are top notch most of the time. This also doesn't mean go to your local PGA Superstore to get fitted there, although these places are good if you want to just try the equipment. They do not have the full range of shaft options that the custom fitters will have. 

    Hope this helps.

  6. Marcus N

    Whatever u do as a new golfer please play hybrids as many as u can get. This will help u big time. This is what I did 3 years ago,I am now an 8.2 handycap. It works.....

  7. imclelland12

    I have the Willson Staff D-100's, and I am an advanced golfer, but they would also be perfect for you. They are cheap, have really nice graphite shafts, and are nice just in general. They cost around $200-$500, so that is a little bit more on the cheap side if that is what you are going for. I would defiantly recommend them. Hope this helped!

  8. Travis W

    While you will hear "Get fitted" several times, beware.  I have seen some pretty ugly swings get fitted into configurations, such as 4 degrees upright for a 5' 5" guy that slashed it with a 30 yard slice, but the clubs fit his swing.  There is no way he is going to get better.  True, club fitting is definitely recommended for anyone to ensure the best possibility of returning the club to square based on one's physical attributes and swing characteristics, but make sure you have a good posture and sound swing before getting fitted.  Since you have only been playing for 6 months, I would start with a couple of lessons from your local pro.  He or she can then determine if your swing needs to change, which will mean that your fitting recommendations may change too.  Starting out, I would invest the dollars in lessons.

    Welcome to golf, and keep at it.  It is a humbling game, but one that I consider the best ever.

  9. Spudstarch

    Hi AlekJ,

    My recommendation is to get the clubs that look/feel the best to you. Its that simple. I started out with a cheap small brand name starter set, then moved up to "Super Game Impovement" clubs, then got a used set of advanced "players" clubs, and finally bought my own new set of fitted CB's. That took place in the span of about 2 years.

    If I had know then what I know now, I would have jumped straight into a set of DCI 990's, the 905R, 200 series vokeys, and a classic circa 62 scotty. Timeless quality at an affordable used price. Once you get the money, you can "upgrade" to newer clubs and have them perfectly fitted to your grooved swing. If you are going to learn, I feel you might as well learn with what you finally want to end up with, and not have to make changes with every set of new "technology".

    Welcome to golf.

    Spud

  10. Jonathan K

    My best advice is to not buy anything unless you are fit first, however; since you're so new to the sport your swing will likely change so just understand that you may need a tune-up in a year or so. The shafts won't likely change but with any tweaks to your swing plane the lies of your clubs might need to change. No matter what, you cannot go wrong with Titleist clubs because they are simply the best in the game.

  11. Gary D

    Two suggestions.  First, go to a professional club fitter, its worth the expense.  Second, take lessons from a PGA certified professional.   Not necessarily in that order.  I would take the lessons first, develop a repeating swing, then go for the club fitting.  Personal bias is to lean towards Titleist AP1's for your first set.  Max game improvement.

  12. Kirk E

    Gary D

    Two suggestions.  First, go to a professional club fitter, its worth the expense.  Second, take lessons from a PGA certified professional.   Not necessarily in that order.  I would take the lessons first, develop a repeating swing, then go for the club fitting.  Personal bias is to lean towards Titleist AP1's for your first set.  Max game improvement.

    I completely agree with you! In my opinion this is the best way to go! 

  13. JFuller

    I just recently released a massive guide on the best golf clubs for beginners. Given the challenge you're facing right now (go expensive with clubs or remain with average ones) I highly recommend you take a look a href="www.golfinfluence.com/.../"at this review/a. I have personally tested each of them and rated them. Check it out and let me know what you think.

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