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jabbing my wedge shots

mark v

I am having a lot of trouble around the greens say 70 years and closer with my wedge shots, using my gap wedge or 60 degree it really doesn't matter, I find myself jabbing at the ball instead of a nice smooth swing, it just started this year, before I really didn't seem to have a lot of problems even tho I am a 15/16 handicapper, need some good advice please

10 Replies

  1. Chris Hatem

    Let the club do the work for you. Think about swinging to a finish that is representative of the ball flight you want (ie low finish for a low shot). 

  2. Chris H

    Maybe the ball is a bit too far back in your stance, or releasing the club a bit too early?

  3. Bob T

    Take a few nice practice swings following thru towards the target and then relax, step up to the ball and let it happen.  Good luck to you!!!

  4. Carl T

    MV, for short chips keep your left arm attached to your rib cage for the entire swing back and through. Put a glove under your left arm pit and keep it there through out the swing. Use your upper body rotation for distance control. This will keep your hands out of the chip. Of course you are going to hinge your wrist immediately on your back swing but keep this hinge and let your chest rotate with your left arm connected to it and keeping your hands ahead of the club face on your follow through. It's when that left arm becomes detached from your chest that the jabbing starts. It's a lot easier to control the ball with your chest rotation than with your detached arms and hands. Been there, done that.
  5. Nikhil R

    Aside for seeing your local PGA Pro, you should check out some of the work that Andrew Rice has done on wedge play. He's Titleist/FJ guy and has done lots of research work on just this topic. He teaches in SC but has lots of great material on the web. One video in particular focuses on 50 yd shots. He's a big trackman guy as well so you'll see lots of references to their terms.

    One think I've taken away from him, among others, is that you want to get to steep on impact -- huge divots look cool but aren't optimal for spin and launch. You want to have a low approach and clip the ball off the turf. Jabbing sounds like trying to hard to hit the ball to generate spin, etc. If you are hitting your 9 or P with good tempo, trying chocking down and hitting those wedge type shots then go back to your wedges....just my .02. good luck.

  6. Dani S

    One of the best tips I've ever heard from a pro was that you should never try to hit a full shot with a wedge. It's not easy. Always club up and either just shorten your swing or play a knock down shot instead. If you have 70 yards, don't play a full 60 degree, open your stance, put the ball back a bit, and try to hit the ball on a lower flight path with your 56 degree. And just think smooth thoughts :P

  7. Victor C

    The problem has a simple and reliable solution.   Check your ego at the door.   Leave the wedges in the bag and use a hybrid to putt the ball when you are off the green.  Use this technique from 1 yard off the green to 60 yards off the green.  I used to be a 12 handicap before doing this.  I am now down to 8.

  8. Carl T

    Victor C

    The problem has a simple and reliable solution.   Check your ego at the door.   Leave the wedges in the bag and use a hybrid to putt the ball when you are off the green.  Use this technique from 1 yard off the green to 60 yards off the green.  I used to be a 12 handicap before doing this.  I am now down to 8.

    Good advice Victor but when you have a bunker between you and the green you have to go airborne. Putt when you can. Chip when you can't putt. Pitch when you can't chip.
  9. Dave C

    Mark I read all the responses and no one suggested loft and lie. The 60 degree wedge has one specific job at full swing, this club is difficult to manipulate, you chunk it you skull it or make a great shot, looks like a one out of three chances of hitting a good shot. I dropped the 60 degree because of this reason and went back to my standard 52 degree 7 degree bounce, for chip and runs and 56 degree 14 degree bounce sand traps and deep rough. I brought my handicap back down from a 7 to a 3 where it normally resides. Talk to your pro about your wedges and give up the 60.
  10. william r

    Yes great advice i have ditched the 60' and at a fitting for Titleist was told i needed more bounce so both 52 and 56 have 14 degree bounce with no more chunks.

    but if you play a links you need less bounce as. The tight lies need more nerve than parkland courses.

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