Swing Speed

A competitor has golf balls made for a certain swing speed, considering a switch back to Titleist.  Are all the golf balls

manufactured by Titleist  for all swing speeds? 

Chris B

A competitor has golf balls made for a certain swing speed, considering a switch back to Titleist.  Are all the golf balls

manufactured by Titleist  for all swing speeds? 

Hi Chris,

Thanks for the post. Good question...

There are a number of variables to consider when looking for the best golf ball for your game, but fitting a golf ball based solely on driver swing speed is a myth.

When you're out on a golf course you are playing a wide variety of golf shots during the round. SInce a golf ball only reacts to the force being applied, different shots require different swing speeds in order to execute them properly. Keeping this in mind, a golf ball must perform for all golfers of all swing speeds on all shots, otherwise it won't perform for any golfer.

Here's a great post that sheds some more light on the topic as well. Definitely check this out...

http://www.titleist.com/teamtitleist/b/tourblog/archive/2011/06/10/titleist-performance-golf-ball-fitting-affects-of-swing-speed.aspx

In the meantime, here are some other helpful links:

Golf Ball Fitting: http://www.titleist.com/golf-ball-fitting/

Online Golf Ball Selection Tool: http://www.titleist.com/golf-ball-fitting/app/

Interestingly enough, they only offer speed-based balls in their urethane tour level series.  When you drop to their mid-range balls, the claim is no longer made.  Another OEM asked you if you wanted to be in the fairway or rough?  No longer an option. That ball has been pulled in my market.

So it comes down to personal preference.  Do you prefer a softer feel, need an optic yellow, need a little more loft, or a more control around the greens (or do you get more control around greens with your swing)?  Do you have to control side spin on your mid to long clubs?  Is price a factor?  Whether DT Solo or ProV1 is the best ball for your game, swing speed is not a factor.

And no ball that is USGA legal can fix a slice.  Once I corrected that problem, the new ProV1x does everything off of metals that I felt the old NXT did for me - that I stockpiled when it was discontinued.  I'm currently using NXT Tour because for my game, even for 100 yards and in, it performs as well as the 1x.  And my driver speed is far, far from 105 mph. 90 when the back is loose.

YEa titleist is the best can't beat it the durability is amazing but the price is so high

Hi Mike,

 

Thank you for your response, I appreciate the feedback and information

 

Chris

I am also a slower swing speed - mid 90's. What I really like about the Pro v1 is it's consistency. I know that the ball always flies the same, so that just takes one possible error out of my game. I tried a competitor and found after six holes or so, the ball just went dead and I lost significant yards. This happened for most of the balls in the dozen I bought. I learned a lesson and switched back. I'm down to two balls only, Titleist and one competitor. Everything else goes to my golfing buddies.

I heard that prov1 is easier to compress than prov1x. Is that true or is it the other way around? I too have a swing speed in the mid 90's and play the prov1x. Is that normal/correct?

I've been playing around six years, and have reasonable swing speed for my age of 66 at 88-90.
I've played around with all brands and keep coming back to the NXT.  It seems to give me the best of all worlds.

Lately, I've found that playing the ProV1 has really helped with my short game as it has gotten better.

Doug W

They are both softer than they used to be, and at 90 mph, my distance with a ProV1x is as good as it ever was with older balls like the NXT and NXT Distance.off of the T.  The 1x was recommended for me as it will carry and roll better than the 1.  That is something that changed over the last 2 releases.  There was a time when the 1x was for the big hitters.

What I do know is the "Tour Grade ball for the non-Tour players" in their "spin" model is shorter off of both metals and irons for me.  The second dozen is now in a First Tee program.  It was a club shorter, and I attribute that to a higher spin.  I've been hesitant to try the NXT Tour-S and the ProV1 since I'm hesitant to give up distance to keep up hopes for a GIR on a 400 yard Par4 alive.

Of all the reasons to weed through the marketing hype for balls, compression off of driver is the least of my worries.  It's 55-60 strokes after my second shot that I need to focus on for better scores.

Benjamin,
My dad has a similar swing speed and plays the ProV1x instead of the ProV1. The conventional theory with the ProV1 balls leans towards the lower the swing speed the more likely that the ProV1 is your ball ...

But obviously that can't always be the case—for example, on tour Zach Johnson, a shorter hitter play the ProV1x and Adam Scott, a very long hitter, plays the regular ProV.

With that being said, feel and driver spin is a big consideration for many with ball choice ... And in my dad's case, he simply gets more distance and straighter drives with the ProV1x. He's has a very low handicap so I know he's carefully chosen his ball.

In summary I wouldn't worry about ball "compression," instead take both balls on the course and do a side-by-side comparison. That will really determine what ball works best for you.

Cheers.