cold weather effects on golf ball distance

ok here is trick i learned i had fur lined club heads made i switch balls to softer ball then i place doz balls i plan to use that day in the floor in my truck with heater running as i am going to the links i have lined the inside box with foil once i get to corse i place the balls in felt bag switch balls out ever hole i personaly dont think there rule problem there

clayton t

ok here is trick i learned i had fur lined club heads made i switch balls to softer ball then i place doz balls i plan to use that day in the floor in my truck with heater running as i am going to the links i have lined the inside box with foil once i get to corse i place the balls in felt bag switch balls out ever hole i personaly dont think there rule problem there

Shenanigans! Although this post is 99% incoherent, I'm fairly sure I've deciphered it correctly, and I have to throw the challenge flag here.  There's no way you actually bring a heated- foil lined box in a felt/fur lined club cover/sack (got a little fuzzy here) to the course.  Putting them in your pocket and switching them every hole probably will do the trick.  I want to see a picture of this contraption.  If you do in fact do this, this might be an ingenious way of keeping my breakfast burritos warm.

well josh there is nothing in the usga rules for amateur status that covers  club head covers or about heating prior to arrieving to course

clayton t

well josh there is nothing in the usga rules for amateur status that covers  club head covers or about heating prior to arrieving to course

You are correct.  I'm just asking if this is something that you actually do, and if so would you be willing to share a picture of your ball heating contraption.

josh what i do it take a 1 doz balls open the box take out all 4 sleeves line the inside the box with foil make sure shiney side toward you do both top and bottom of the box ... while your driving to the golf course take sleeves back out pace all sleeves and empty box of floor have your heater going on the floor... when get there put sleeves back in wrap box with towel or felt bag or something

 

I actually did a science fair project for my school on the effect of temperature on a golf ball and calculated that you will lose 5-7 yards because of cold weather

clayton t

josh what i do it take a 1 doz balls open the box take out all 4 sleeves line the inside the box with foil make sure shiney side toward you do both top and bottom of the box ... while your driving to the golf course take sleeves back out pace all sleeves and empty box of floor have your heater going on the floor... when get there put sleeves back in wrap box with towel or felt bag or something

Do you think it could hold a breakfast burrito also?

I have been golf for over 40 years and I have found out that cold weather effects the golf ball distance.  Keep your bag with sticks and balls in your home before playing.  Thanks,  Ross  Pinehurst, NC

I know a "scratch" golfer (assistant pro), and he says that in temperatures of less than 50 degrees, he will play a ball that has less compression.  In that way he was able still to compress the ball a bit easier.

The cold weather causes the compression to get higher. For someone with a higher swing speed, that could, and theoretically should mean that the ball with fly farther. For someone with a slower speed, however, that would make the ball go even shorter, as you would be unable to compress the ball as much as normal.

For example, someone with say, a pro long driver swing speed, they could theoretically play a max compression ball in the coldest possible weather and still hit it farther, so long as they can still swing max speed, and still fully compress the ball (there should be no reason for them not to be able to).

Hi all,

Great discussion going here. Just wanted to jump in quickly with some feedback from the golf ball R&D team on the topic of weather/temperature and the effect on your golf ball. Here is what they had to say when asked... 

“Will temperature effect golf balls in different ways?”

R&D: If you are playing with cold golf balls you’ll see distance loss. We recommend playing with room temperature golf balls. However, the other factors that typically accompany cold-weather golf (i.e. wearing more layers, frozen ground, wind, etc.) might have a bigger impact on a golfer’s overall performance.

We would recommend always playing the same model golf ball. Keep in mind, changing golf balls changes every shot. So the best way to take that element out of the equation is to find the best golf ball for your game and play it consistently. 

Hope this helps provide some more insight.

Cheers (and stay warm out there)!

- Mike

Thanks for the reply Mike,

In all seriousness I will keep a ball in my pocket and switch it every other hole.  I definitely notice distance loss in the winter, but like your R&D buddies said, it could be from a combination of things.  Clubbing up usually does the trick for me.  I'd rather lose yards than lose spin and feel from close range.

Your right Josh. I play in cold weather from Nov through Jan here in North East Ohio. Keep them in your pocket and keep changing. But the loss of some yards can be made up with club selection. Anyway a few yards is no big deal. It's not distance with win's it's having a good swing and hitting your target.

A lot of fellows switch to a women's ball during the winter months to try and offset some of the lost distance from the colder air.  Keep the golf balls warm before going to the course and consider trying a very low compression women's ball.

Hi Folks!

Living in cleve we experience a lot of pretty cool weather in the fall, but there are too many nice days to give up golf. My solution to the loss of distance from the cold, extra clothing, etc. is to switch golf balls. I play the NXT Tour most of the season, but switch to the DT Solo once it gets down to 55 & below. I find this restores some height and distance to the ball flight. I'm not sure what all the causes and effects are, but the ball makes a difference.

Steve M.