Optimal ball compression

Titleist promotes that the best ball for an individual is the ball that performs best through the entire bag. Completely accepted. 

Titleist also promotes that all players compress every ball on every shot. Perhaps true, but I am suspicious that perhaps not every player optimally compresses every ball on every shot. Titleist recently posted a video demonstrating similar ball compression with 120 mph and 175 mph swing speeds - Pro V1 tested. No doubt there is a threshold that is achieved at faster swing speeds (>95-100 mph), and this video curiously fails to demonstrate compression in the driver swing speed range of most golfers (80-90 mph). Also, as appropriately promoted by Titleist, most strokes on the course do not occur with the driver, so a very relevant question pertains to whether the 'average' golfer (average swing speed) achieves adequate ball compression to allow for optimal ball striking - particularly with mid-long irons? Are most other ball manufacturers wrong in promoting that optimal ball striking is, to a significant degree, dependent upon optimal ball compression?

Thank you

Hi ML W,

Thanks for the post and questions. To clarify, in the video you reference, the speeds being displayed as part of the testing are ball speeds and not swing speed.

As you may be aware, the USGA sets the speed limit on clubs and balls, and the ratio is a maximum 1.5 ball speed (when hit perfectly) for each mph of club speed, ie:  

80 mph of club speed= 120 mph of ball speed

90 mph of club speed= 135 mph of ball speed

100 mph of club speed= 150 ball speed

110 mph of club speed= 165 ball speed

As you can see, the team was testing across a wide range of swing speeds and ball speeds.

In terms of your question around compression, one important key to keep in mind is that no single element of golf ball design determines the golf ball’s performance or distance. Titleist Golf Ball R&D designs with multiple construction elements (such as core size, chemistry, hardness, number and type of intermediate layers, cover material and thickness, dimple design, etc.) to achieve specific golf ball performance characteristics.

All of these elements work together to determine a golf ball’s performance. Compression is simply a result of this process and is a test of the relative softness of a golf ball which relates to how firm or soft a golf ball feels to a golfer.

While there is no performance benefit to choosing a specific compression, many golfers (regardless of swing speed) do have feel preferences. Golfers who prefer softer feel may prefer lower compression golf balls.

Hope this helps clarify!

Mike,

Great feedback, as always from Titleist.

I have a swing speed of 90-95. Ironically, I have always used Pro V1x over Pro V1 because theV1's feel like rocks coming off my club face compared to the 1x's. I suspect this is completely non-sensical from your perspective, nonetheless, and as you stated, it comes down to individual feel preferences.

Thank you again,

MLW

Something to consider - the spin rate of the ball.  That has a significant impact on the distance the ball travels.  Personally, compression is a factor, but spin is more significant to me...

Very interesting topic.  Some times I think that we put too much thought into which ball to use.  After the research is completed and you have found a ball in your desired range, I think how the ball feels is important as well.

Therefore, once I started hitting the ProV1x (a long time ProV1 player), I don't think I will switch balls until I get too old to play the ProV1x.  The performance of the Pro1x is outstanding for me as well as the over all feel of the ball coming off the club face.

So, the ProV1x is the ball in the bag for this player!

ToddL

Something to consider - the spin rate of the ball.  That has a significant impact on the distance the ball travels.  Personally, compression is a factor, but spin is more significant to me...

And spin will affect left and right, not just distance.  I'm thinking about going with the Pro V1x because of the lower spin rate on longer clubs.  I'm a fairly accurate driver, but I'm more concerned with doing everything I can to keep it straight than I am with distance.

Greg K, I don't know how old you are but I am a month shy of 70 years young, and I am still playing ProV's. While I prefer to play the ProV1x, I have no problem playing the Prov1. I give up a little distance with the 1, but gain spin on the green. I will generally play which ever I can get the cheapest..

Click to show quoted text
Team Titleist
Greg K replied to Re: Optimal ball compression in Golf Balls.
Very interesting topic.  Some times I think that we put too much thought into which ball to use.  After the research is completed and you have found a ball in your desired range, I think how the ball feels is important as well.
Therefore, once I started hitting the ProV1x (a long time ProV1 player), I don't think I will switch balls until I get too old to play the ProV1x.  The performance of the Pro1x is outstanding for me as well as the over all feel of the ball coming off the club face.
So, the ProV1x is the ball in the bag for this player!
You were sent this email because you opted to receive email notifications when someone responded to this forum thread.
View and reply online or reply to this email.
To unsubscribe from this thread, disable notifications here.
 
 
The information transmitted is intended only for the
person or entity to which it is addressed and may
contain confidential and/or privileged material. Any
review, retransmission, dissemination or other use
of, or taking of any action in reliance upon, this
information by persons or entities other than the
intended recipient is prohibited. If you received this
in error, please delete the material from any
computer.