Golf Etiquette

Here are some things that bug me when I am playing golf. These are minor in comparison to not raking bunkers, stepping in one's putt line, etc., but never the less I feel they are worth mentioning.

When playing with a partner(s) I do not need to hear him say, "Knock it in the hole." Most golfers I know always try to hole their putts. Even long putts, I try to hole it and if I miss try to be with in 3 feet or less of the hole.

When I am hitting the fairway with my driver I don't mind someone saying "shot or good shot" are something complimentary but don't tell me when I'm getting ready to drive especially late in a round, "You have been like a machine all day. We need this one in the fairway."

When I hit a ball fat or thin I don't need one of my partners to tell me that. Don't you think I would know.

When I am getting ready to hit a shot, whether it be a putt or a tee ball, don't stand directly behind me. If you want to see how a ball breaks on the putting green you can see it just as good from the side to see the break.

Don't start giving me golf lessons if I make bad shot unless I ask you. Best thing to do is to say nothing unless asked.

If we are sharing a cart please clean up your food or drink that falls on the seat. I do not like a chunk of chocolate candy bar stuck to the rear of my shorts or a big read stain from your spilled gator aid.

If we are sharing a cart and I hit a ball into the rough and your ball is safe in the fairway, please drive while I still have some landmarks in sight to my ball. Your ball in the fairway will not be hard to find.

If I am really playing well please don't tell me what my score is or say something like "Man, you have made six pars in a row. Keep up the good play". This is kind of like telling a baseball pitcher he is pitching a perfect game and only needs3 more strike outs. When the round is over OK but please let me stay in my zone. Don't bring me out of it with your well intended comments.

Golf is a fun game but there is a time to comment and there is a time to say nothing to make it even more pleasant. I'm sure there are others who have some things that bug them when they play. Let's hear them.

Carl T

Here are some things that bug me when I am playing golf. These are minor in comparison to not raking bunkers, stepping in one's putt line, etc., but never the less I feel they are worth mentioning.

When playing with a partner(s) I do not need to hear him say, "Knock it in the hole." Most golfers I know always try to hole their putts. Even long putts, I try to hole it and if I miss try to be with in 3 feet or less of the hole. One hears this asinine comment at PGA or LPGA tournaments all the time and it probably pees off the pros.

When I am hitting the fairway with my driver I don't mind someone saying "shot or good shot" are something complimentary but don't tell me when I'm getting ready to drive especially late in a round, "You have been like a machine all day. We need this one in the fairway." 

When I hit a ball fat or thin I don't need one of my partners to tell me that. Don't you think I would know.

When I am getting ready to hit a shot, whether it be a putt or a tee ball, don't stand directly behind me. If you want to see how a ball breaks on the putting green you can see it just as good from the side to see the break.  This is along the same lines as not stepping in one's putt line - we were taught as caddies to not stand in the line of someone's golf shot.

Don't start giving me golf lessons if I make bad shot unless I ask you. Best thing to do is to say nothing unless asked. This person is one of the 18 people you least desire to play golf with.

If we are sharing a cart please clean up your food or drink that falls on the seat. I do not like a chunk of chocolate candy bar stuck to the rear of my shorts or a big read stain from your spilled gator aid.

If we are sharing a cart and I hit a ball into the rough and your ball is safe in the fairway, please drive while I still have some landmarks in sight to my ball. Your ball in the fairway will not be hard to find.

If I am really playing well please don't tell me what my score is or say something like "Man, you have made six pars in a row. Keep up the good play". This is kind of like telling a baseball pitcher he is pitching a perfect game and only needs3 more strike outs. When the round is over OK but please let me stay in my zone. Don't bring me out of it with your well intended comments.  If you play golf in CA, nobody really talks to each other except on the green or the tee box.

Golf is a fun game but there is a time to comment and there is a time to say nothing to make it even more pleasant. I'm sure there are others who have some things that bug them when they play. Let's hear them.

As far as the carts....  I almost never ride a cart anyhow, unless the course requires it.

 

Carl T, if you've ever seen the movie, "Stripes", Sergeant Hulka would tell you, "Lighten up Francis". If your partner offers you encouragement by saying, "knock it in the hole", focus as normal and try to make the putt. If someone stands behind your line of play, simply say with a smile, "Joe, would do me a favor and move to one side or the other?" As for someone telling you what your score is or that you've made 6 pars in a row, it's a complement or they are trying to "rattle" you. Don't get angry and say to yourself,"I'm going to shank it now!". Instead, focus on what you did to score those 6 pars in a row.

I agree that etiquette is very important, but we also need to keep in mind that everybody is different and may have a different perception of what is being said.  In my opinion, when somebody is making some of the comments outlined by Carl T, they are generally meant to be in a complementary or supportive manner.  It is not meant to rattle you (although sometimes this type of gamesmanship may be going on).  Take it for what it is worth on it's face and move along.

The game of golf is really about focus and learning to block these types of things out to focus on what you are doing with your shot.  Does it always work?  Of course not, but I find that working to block any of the little things that others do that I may find annoying will help my game.  These are perfect opportunities to learn to turn the "focus switch" on and off.

At the end of the day, the majority of us do not do this for a living and we should take it as such.  I probably say some of the things that are outlined as being annoying, but I am doing it because I am pulling for the other player and want them to play well.  I actually enjoy seing others play well!

I think the Sergant Hulka quote is appropriate for all of us when we start to get annoyed at something others areound us are doing.

Mike C

I agree that etiquette is very important, but we also need to keep in mind that everybody is different and may have a different perception of what is being said.  In my opinion, when somebody is making some of the comments outlined by Carl T, they are generally meant to be in a complementary or supportive manner.  It is not meant to rattle you (although sometimes this type of gamesmanship may be going on).  Take it for what it is worth on it's face and move along.

The game of golf is really about focus and learning to block these types of things out to focus on what you are doing with your shot.  Does it always work?  Of course not, but I find that working to block any of the little things that others do that I may find annoying will help my game.  These are perfect opportunities to learn to turn the "focus switch" on and off.

At the end of the day, the majority of us do not do this for a living and we should take it as such.  I probably say some of the things that are outlined as being annoying, but I am doing it because I am pulling for the other player and want them to play well.  I actually enjoy seing others play well!

I think the Sergant Hulka quote is appropriate for all of us when we start to get annoyed at something others areound us are doing.

I agree that focus is probably the most underrated and important part of golf after you have the basics down. "Knock it in the hole" is probably the most heard comment when on the putting green. When I first heard this comment about a zillion years ago it did break my focus because I'm thinking why would I not try to knock the ball into the hole. To this day I still do not understand why some golfers have to say that to their partner. It's just a pet peeve of mine. It falls into the same category of obnoxious as when the same guy follows a tour player and has to yell out on tee shots, "It's in the hole" or "Buh Buh Boom". I was reading an article in the latest Golf Digest and there was a statement that I liked, "Gentlemen we are not here to have fun, we are here to play golf." Well, actually we can do both, just don't say things that are the obvious. And one more thing, when your partner or opponent is putting, please make sure your shadow does not cast over the putting line or the hole.