Out of Bounds ruling

I need a little help here. I was playing stroke play and my ball off the tee came to rest on the inside of an out of bounds stake (fairway side) that was movable. What is the USGA ruling on this? Many thanks, Matt
To quote John McEnroe. That was out! Sorry

Some tough luck on this one. You may not move posts, stakes or other objuects that mark Out-of-Bounds. You must play the ball as it lies. You may move yellow and red hazard stakes.

Matt,

 

Technically, if the ball was touching the out of bounds stake then it is considered out of bounds. If the ball settles on any part of the out of bounds line then it is deemed to be out of bounds. From an earlier response, you cannot move the out of bounds stake but from your description it seems the ball was touching the out of bounds stake. Sorry, go back to your orignal position and try again.

Matt,

 

Please disregard my previous post. i was wrong. the ball must be completely out of bounds befopre it is deemed to be out ofbounds. A ball touching an out of bounds stake is still in bounds so you'd have to play it as it lies.

The ball has to be entirely out of bounds to be considered out of bounds, so you saved a penalty there ... however, you cannot alter any boundary markings, so your only options are 1. play it as it lies or 2. take the penalty of an unplayable lie.

A good way to remember this rule is that line are in. So if the ball is on the out of bounds line, it's in bounds. If the ball is touching any part of the green it's on the green. If the ball is touching a hazard line it's in the hazard.

You got the answer now; however, how would you all feel if the USGA and R&A amended the penalty to that of water hazards - 1) stroke and distance or 2) drop within 2 club lengths of where ball last crossed the margin? To me, it would speed up play.

It might be a good idea to get a USGA rules book.  Your pro shop should have them.  You need to be able to find the rule while you are out on the course.  Knowing the rules can really help.

Fred, to your point, the Golf Channel has been thinking along these lines as well in an attempt to speed up recreational play. http://www.golfchannel.com/news/golf-central-blog/relaxed-rules-easing-and-adding-common-sense/

Chris H
Fred, to your point, the Golf Channel has been thinking along these lines as well in an attempt to speed up recreational play. http://www.golfchannel.com/news/golf-central-blog/relaxed-rules-easing-and-adding-common-sense/

That's interesting, Chris. Perhaps they can work to get the rule changed.

I think drop within 2 club lengths, no closer with a stroke penalty is perfect for any OB infraction, would like to see it as an  offiical option.

To make it consistent with the current rule you would have to drop and add two strokes.  So you would be hitting 4...which is what you would be had you gone back to the tee and hit a second tee shot and landed in the same position.

Frankly, it would be a mess on weekends if everyone went back to the original spot on lost balls and/or OB shots.  But I have played with folks that only add one stroke penalty too.  That seems improper.

Fred C

You got the answer now; however, how would you all feel if the USGA and R&A amended the penalty to that of water hazards - 1) stroke and distance or 2) drop within 2 club lengths of where ball last crossed the margin? To me, it would speed up play.

Fred - That's how my friends and I have played in our "friendly" matches for years.  I see very little difference between OB and a water hazard, so I don't know why they are treated differently.  I'm sure there must be a reason, but I'm missing it.

I have played a few rounds in Japan and on some of the courses they have two ropes going across the fairway in the driving zone. Hit it OB and you drop between the ropes and are hitting 4.