Putting problems

I had huge problems with putting towards the end of last season, At our final tournament of the year I shot an 84 with 7 3 putts and a 4 putt.  Just lookin for some good putting tips to practice in the off season.  Thanks.

Stephen,

Like many other golfers, putting problems exist because of too many thoughts and lack of practice. Take a look at why you are three putting. If you feel as though you are reading the greens well, then speed is the killer. So why is your speed inconsistent? Number 1, make sure that the putter shaft is leaning towards the target at address. This is the number one reason why speed becomes inconsistent. When you look down at the putter, think about the grip end of the shaft leaning just inside your front thigh. This will give the putter a leaning effect and will help the putter move on an arc instead of too low to the ground. This will help you hit the sweet spot of the putter.

Also, before you play make sure you are spending some time on the putting green prior to your round. Start hitting putts from 30 to 40 feet before hitting puts from shorter distances. Hitting longer putts first will get your feel for the greens faster than hitting short putts. Then hit some putts from 3 to 5 feet to build some confidence prior to your round. Hope this helps.

 

When you are back on a course, now the 2+ putts didn't happen.  I thought you said 4-put, but I can't remember.  Othewise they will haunt you. 

Note on Tuesday DJ followed a lost drive and a double with a perfect drive and a chip for eagle. He is mentally past the last hole on the next tee box.

I need to putt better (OK but not great).  4 putts are a thing of the past.   My 3 putters are usually when I have a long downhill putt.

Generally OK with long putts.   My killer is missing the 6-10' putts by an inch or two (I could have had a subpar round on a shorter course awhile ago but missed 3 birdie putts by an inch).

My main issue before was pulling putts.  The tip that helped was not to look at the hole when putting but rather putt on the line and listen for it to drop.

Being a retired Navy Firecontrolman, I came up with a rather unique way to line putts up and it works for me in most cases (except for multiple breaks, in which case I take the average).   If you take the clubhead and point the toe toward the pin (with the sole flat on the green), you are going to notice the shaft doesn't point vertical in relation to the horizon.  You rotate the club until the points vertical in relation to the horizon and that is the line. They have this wonderful thing called "crosslevel" on a fire control radar that keeps the antenna vertical with respect to the horizon.

 

The 30-40 feet practice putts is a great idea, never looked at it that way.

I came up with an unconventional putting drill that has been working out really well for me and my friends I have introduced it to. Most people I know don't have enough of an attention span to spend nearly as much time practicing their putting as they should, so I made a bit of a game that they can do and keeps them trying to beat their best score enough where they put a little more focus on it. 

On the putting green I'll simulate 18 holes at random as I go from various distances and always assuming I am on the green in regulation, so 1 putt is a birdie and 2 is a par, etc.. The first putt you can putt as normal, but each putt after for that hole you are only allowed to use one hand on the putter. The purpose is that it emphasizes getting your first putt always in range close enough to where it isn't difficult to tap it in one handed. You track your score for the 18 holes as you go along and after you finish one round, do at least one more trying to beat your previous round. When you get comfortable being able to tap in two putt from anywhere on the green.. then on the course even if you don't get the first putt quite as close, you'll have a lot more confidence drilling in that second putt with both hands on the putter. 

A lot of people don't think about it this way, but assuming you made every green in regulation, the difference between an 18 handicap and a scratch player is the difference between a two putt and a three putt. See the line from behind your ball before you walk up to your putt, line up properly, set up properly, putt your line with confidence and trust your distance. If you look at the hole more than once or more than one second once you address the ball.. back off and start again because you're already over thinking the putt. Good luck.

Practice...Practice.....Practice   is the only way you will become a good putter....But like Eddie said, before a round always shoot 30-40 footers to get the feel of your strock and the speed of the greens... Put 2 tees in the ground 10 feet apart and put to the line inbetween...Save the draining for your round

a couple of factors you may not have considered. one. most clubs roll the greens to make them faster for their club championships, two. they also chose more difficult pin placements. this is designed to make the final a little more challenging. these things easly add a few strokes to any average golfers round. now if you just having a acctual putting slump. some times you just have to relax the grip and feel out a few puts. before focusing agian. 

Get your self a belly or a long putter. I will never go back to the short shaft again.

Ron M.

Practice...Practice.....Practice   is the only way you will become a good putter....But like Eddie said, before a round always shoot 30-40 footers to get the feel of your strock and the speed of the greens... Put 2 tees in the ground 10 feet apart and put to the line inbetween...Save the draining for your round

Well said, PRACTICE!!   But I disagree with the "save the draining for the round".   After taking quite a few practice putts from a good 30-40 feet, keep moving closer.  FInish your practice with the 3-5 footers in the cup.  For me, even in practice, sinking a putt time after time, hearing it hit the cup, boosts my confidence and I can hopefully take that into my round with me. 

Curtis M

Ron M.

Practice...Practice.....Practice   is the only way you will become a good putter....But like Eddie said, before a round always shoot 30-40 footers to get the feel of your strock and the speed of the greens... Put 2 tees in the ground 10 feet apart and put to the line inbetween...Save the draining for your round

Well said, PRACTICE!!   But I disagree with the "save the draining for the round".   After taking quite a few practice putts from a good 30-40 feet, keep moving closer.  FInish your practice with the 3-5 footers in the cup.  For me, even in practice, sinking a putt time after time, hearing it hit the cup, boosts my confidence and I can hopefully take that into my round with me. 

I agree with Curtis in regards to practicing short putts.  I do the long putts mainly for the stroke but those 4-10 footers will make or break your golf game.   I spent 20 minutes on the way home from work one Thur doing exactly that and I had no problem and actually got two birdies that day.  My issue before had been shorter putts (I had one round where I missed 3 birdie putts by an inch and that would have been a sub par round on that par 34 course).   I also had one opportunity for eagle on a short par 4 almost 2 years ago but 3 putted for a par. 

Stephen J

I had huge problems with putting towards the end of last season, At our final tournament of the year I shot an 84 with 7 3 putts and a 4 putt.  Just lookin for some good putting tips to practice in the off season.  Thanks.

 
Wow, 9 shots dropped from putting and you still scored an 84. You have a pretty solid game! My advise is get it close on the first putt. Get it started on line, but make sure that if it isn't in range where you know you will sink it then pace it so that it stays within two feet or so. If you can't make the first putt, leave yourself a second one in gimme range. Think of putting like safe shots and hero shots. Don't go for hero shots if you don't need to.

Lou G

 I also had one opportunity for eagle on a short par 4 almost 2 years ago but 3 putted for a par. 

lol, I did that this fall. Drove the green at 345 and left myself with a 12 footer for eagle. Sure enough I 3 putted. It was after that I started to really work on my putting. My practice pretty much consists of "2 putt from anywhere". I work on judging distance and pace. I try to get it on line, but I don't risk beating the late brakes by hitting too firm that it goes way past the hole. The long sunk putts are just bonuses.

Hello Stephen J

I got this practice tip from Hale Irwin (on TV of course, I dont know the man). On the practice green he'll line up 10 footers and go through his normal putting routine but, right before he strokes the putt, he shuts his eyes and keeps them shut while making the putting stroke. He then listens to hear if the ball drops. I've tried it and I usually leave my first few attempts woefully short but then it gets dialed in and I just start trusting the putting stroke. I am definitely adding this to my practice routine.

Play the ball slightly forward than usual on the short ones?...  I started doing this and noticed the ball got out of its spot better and in the hole more often.

Practice, practice, practice...