Caddying

Started by : Fred C |

Jump To Last Reply

Fred C


I'm seriously considering becoming a professional caddy. Unfortunately, I have no idea how to connect with a player needing someone that WILL: 1. show up  2. keep up and 3. shut up. Can any of you offer solid advice?

fred k


fred,

i've been fortunate enough to caddy at the mini tour level a few times and know a couple of loopers on the pga tour, and at one point in my life, like you, i had thoughts about chasing the sun.  the one thing you have to consider is if you want to make a comfortable living out of this, think hard about it.  unless you get lucky and hook up with a top 50 player, hotwire.com will become your best friend because you'll need to live on the cheap.  also, all the travel may sound glamorous, but it can become tiring real quick.

having said all that, your best bet to get a feel for tour level caddying is to 1) volunteer at your local pga/lpga tour stop as a pro-am caddy or talk to the caddymaster about trying to pick up a bag for a monday qualifier.  2) try the women's tours - futures and lpga.  there's a better chance of picking up a monday qualifier.  lots of futures tour stops look for volunteer caddies, too.  web.com tour stops might work also.  3) try to work the players parking lots.  ask every player you see if they need a caddy for the week.  again, the women's side is your best bet.  security is pretty tight on the pga tour and they won't let just anyone into the player's parking lot.

best of luck.

-fred

Lou G


I caddied when I was 14 just like Nate.  Different ball of wax caddying for pros vs country club golfers but there are a couple commonalities - keep the clubs  clean, find the ball and keep a little ahead of the player.  The caddy for a pro definitely has to know his or her stuff when it comes to the course and golf in general. 

Caddying for a country clubber is, more or less, only speak when spoken to.  The ones most likely to ask for advice are the women.  Unless the male members know the caddy personally they seldom ask for advice no matter how bad they play.  Usually the caddies that get asked for advice are the older ones. 

eboos


Be realistic, but don't ever believe that you can't do it. I have had friend who have achieved at the highest levels in every sport that I've been involved with. John Montesi was a pro skate boarder with several pro models and a host for the X-games. Adam Watkins just picked up and left VA and moved to California and ended up becoming a regional advertising manager for Ride BMX magazine. Alex Dunsten was a marketing manager for Ducati, then Michael Jordan Motorsports and now Monster Energy.

If this is your dream dude, go for it. You have to be realistic, but it also takes guts to go against the safe advise like these guys did.

Griffin N


Fred, 

I am actually looking for a caddy right now so if you could email me at gbear2000@live.com if you are interested please do. My name is Griffin Nyi and I would like to interview you via Skype if possible. I will be traveling a lot so you may need to supply some money for hotel/air SOMETIMES.

Would love to meet you 

Griffin Nyi

Dallin H


Fred C

I'm seriously considering becoming a professional caddy. Unfortunately, I have no idea how to connect with a player needing someone that WILL: 1. show up  2. keep up and 3. shut up. Can any of you offer solid advice?

Fred,

I might have some contacts for you through the First Tee of FTW. I met a guy who used to caddy for J.J. Henry. He might have some advise on who to get in touch with.  I could help you guys get in touch.

Dallin