Pairs on golf course (2-somes)

Started by : Mitch747 |

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Mitch747


I work as a Marshall. During busy times (weekends) Starters are required to pair-up 2somes and singles, why do so many players who know this want to play alone or as a 2-some. Please give answers. 

Thanks

Mitch

taywright2


I have to admit, I'm one of those guys that when he hear's he has to be paired up with someone, thinks "oh crap, maybe if I hurry up I'll be able to get out on my own, or maybe if we're lucky they'll let us out without him"

Honestly, I've met some great people while playing golf and for the most part I've had good experiences meeting and playing with new people. But it's kind of like when you go to see a movie and then the person at the front says, "guess what, we're going to have you sitting next to your wife and then want you take this other person in with you so they can watch the movie too". For the most part things work out, but your secretly annoyed the whole time because you were planning on it just being a comfortable time with your wife. When I go out to play with my brothers, it's a time to bond again and we like to joke around. Not everyone likes playing our style of golf because we play fast and don't mind if we're all putting together at the same time to speed things along. 

I think I confused myself, did I just compare my brothers to my wife? :)

Ultimate foursome...no question,  playing with my two brothers and my dad. My father is in Brazil for three years, cant wait until he gets back to complete our foursome again. Until then, I'll try and be more willing to accept another "member" of the family to join our brotherly threesome

Wow, now this is really starting to sound weird, 

-T

Christian J


Luckily I play on a smaller municipal course, and can play with whoever I want.  I personally would rather play with people who I know, preferably friends or family members.  Sometimes it will be busy though and I 'll hop in with another single.  I actually enjoy this sometimes because it gives me a chance to meet new people and test my game.

Lou G


It's usually better to play with another single vs being the 4th with a 3 some.  The 3 some is probably preoccupied with their golf match.  Usually the other single is out for a relaxing game of golf.

I usually prefer to play with people I know well. 

This is one of the primary reasons I play golf on early Friday morning (besides the fact that my schedule is so whacked on Saturdays and Sundays that playing is almost impossible).   Some days it is nice to have the course to yourself to try new things - generally the rule is I hit the shot that counts (even if I may mishit it) and then may take a practice shot afterward. 

Mitch747


The problem occurs when players do not want to be paired up.

Chris92009


The game of golf is social and I enjoy being paired up with people...it is a lot of fun meeting new friends...

Trevor A


I play two of courses as a single a couple times a week. One has 27 holes and I know the starters well so they often times work it so I play alone and almost always it works out but if its slow playing I will ask the group behind to join. The other course has 18 holes and no matter what (slow or packed) I am always paired with other players, sometimes 3-4 singles in a group. They will make a single wait 5-10 minutes so you can play with another player or 2 to keep pace of play similar among all groups. I can't say what one I like more but either approach wont keep me from playing. 

Josh G


Chris92009

The game of golf is social and I enjoy being paired up with people...it is a lot of fun meeting new friends...

You said it Chris. Golf is more fun with friends.  That said I'd rather not wait for others to show up if the course is wide open in front of me. if the place is packed or even slightly busy I'd rather play with new friends than wait by myself.

Daniel Rimmelzwaan


I think it completely depends on the course, and probably mostly on how the conversation goes when you get paired up when you don't want to be paired up. For reasons that are nobody's business but my own, I might want to play by myself. If I am given a tee time as a single, I expect to be let onto the course without any problem. If the starter is a nice guy about it though I might be willing to pair up even when I was looking forward to a couple of hours of solitude.

Of course I know that at certain times the course will be packed, and it is just not fun to stand around waiting for my next shot, so I try to avoid those times, and I always ask if it's going to be busy when I book a tee time. What I often do is try to see if they will let me play the back 9 early in the morning. 

My point is that if you book a single, and you give them a choice to be paired up, and they decline, you HAVE to let them play solo without being unpleasant about it. I think it is INCREDIBLY rude to then make an issue out of it. If the course doesn't want to let singles or pairs play (which is of course a choice that any course is allowed make), they should simply not give them a tee time.

Lou G


Trevor A

I play two of courses as a single a couple times a week. One has 27 holes and I know the starters well so they often times work it so I play alone and almost always it works out but if its slow playing I will ask the group behind to join. The other course has 18 holes and no matter what (slow or packed) I am always paired with other players, sometimes 3-4 singles in a group. They will make a single wait 5-10 minutes so you can play with another player or 2 to keep pace of play similar among all groups. I can't say what one I like more but either approach wont keep me from playing. 

I actually asked the person behind me one time to join up because there was a single ahead of me that was so SLOW.  Turned out to be a reasonable game of golf.

On the military courses, especially in Hawaii, you have no choice but to be paired with 2-3 players and one of the exec courses  in SD just about always sends out foursomes. 

Being paired up can be a bomb or bust.  I'll still go out and play golf regardless. 

Josh G


Daniel R

First of all, I just love playing golf by myself, so I don't feel compelled to invite other people every time that I want to play (which is often a spur of the moment kind of thing). If it's busy I don't mind being paired up, I've had really enjoyable rounds playing with people I don't know. Most of the people that I know that play golf are very busy people, so most of the times that I do want to be social it's either 2 or 3 guys. It's not that I don't want to play in a 4 some, I just don't have very many golf buddies.

I can't speak for others, but whether the course staff is inconvenienced because they 'have to' pair me up simply does not occur to me, it is not a factor in deciding whether to play or not. When I call to book as a single I leave it up to the pro to pair me up. If they offer me a tee time, I assume that it's OK to play. It never occurred to me that this might be a problem, are you suggesting that it is?

I play a lot of golf by myself. I find it very relaxing and peaceful, but I also enjoy getting paired up with people. I guess I just enjoy golfing in general. As long as I get out and it's around in less than 4 1/2 hours I'm happy guy. Heck, I even be happy with a 5 1/2 hour round if I knew I'd hit every fairway.

pulplvr


Having worked both as a starter and a marshal, I think I understand what mitch is getting at.  Your job as a starter is to get people onto the course in a manner that ensures both smooth play and a reasonable pace.  When multiple twosomes are booked, but not paired by the pro shop, it makes sense to send them out as foursomes instead of consecutive twosomes--more people on the course in the same space of time=more revenue for the course.  As a marshal, you try to keep players moving at a good pace, to make the game more enjoyable for everyone.  If a twosome is stuck between a bunch of foursomes, it is often an uncomfortable pace for the twosome.  Many complain repeatedly to the marshal about "slow" play because they are continually waiting for the four golfers in front of them.  This most often happens, in my experience, when two golfers refuse to be paired with anyone else.  I found most of the people I ended up playing golf with on a regular basis by just going to the course and being paired with someone.  Doesn't always work out, but you meet some very interesting people and can make lasting friendships that you would not otherwise have.

Mitch747


Thank you. You are correct.

Daniel Rimmelzwaan


Yeah I can imagine  it's quite frustrating when a pair complains about slow play when they don't want to pair up. Not being a Marshall I can only speculate how annoying that must be. 

Let me ask you though... If my pair has a 8 am tee time, and another pair has a 8:10 tee time, and the 4 some behind them show up early, even though THEY have a 8:20 tee time, do you still pair the 2 somes up? Would you do that even if you're running on schedule? I would have no problem making them wait for their tee time.

Mitch747


At my course. They often pair up the 2-somes if the times are that close together.

Limpin'' In


Have met many great folks, over the years, being paired up with them on golf courses.  Used to travel quite a bit and play new courses.  I would actually ask to wait and be paired with someone rather than play as a single. 

We have a regular group at our home course.  Any where from 3 to 8 can show up.  If we have more than 5, we break into a couple of groups.  It is not unusual for us to invite new players to join us.  We do appreciate the game as more social than serious.

One issue is a course putting out singles or twos by themselves on weekends.  We have the first tee time on weekends and play quickly.... 3 hours or under for 18 holes.  Now and then a single in a cart will begin to catch us.  In most cases, he/she can wait.  There is no justification in slowing us down to allow a single through when we are already playing fast. 

A poster has mentioned a course should not allow a single or a two to make a tee time if they will be expected to pair up.  There can be "local" rules at any course and the requirement to pair up may be just that.  It would be nice if every course would ask, "I have you down for the 9:30 tee time.  How many will be in your group?"  When you reply there is just one or two, the course should state you may well be paired up.  If you "fib" and tell the course you have a four and show up as a single, you should either be billed for an extra tee time or barred from booking future times.  It's a revenue issue and a pace of play issue... both.  If a single is allowed to book a prime time and not accept being paired up, the course loses revenue.  If a single is allowed to book a prime time and play alone, he will be pushing those in front of him/her. 

An interesting issue, with no good resolution unless the courses take charge and enforce pairing up during prime time.

Daniel Rimmelzwaan


I do agree that it's a bad thing to book a 4 if you don't plan to play as a 4. I also agree that when you play during prime time you have no business complaining about slow play (which I have never done by the way). It sounds like some people game the system a little bit, which I can totally imagine is frustrating for course staff. I just want to advocate for legitimate single/pair golfers :) I'm not there to deliberately make things difficult, I just want to play golf the way that I enjoy playing golf. I don't complain about anything, I keep to myself, I like to give other people space to play the way they want to play, but I'd like that courtesy extended to me too.

When I call the course, and I book a 1 or 2, to me that is an agreed upon service that I pay an agreed upon price for, it's essentially a contract. They're not doing me a favor by "letting me play", they are delivering the service that I paid for. If it's a problem to play a 1 or 2 then don't sell that service, or be clear up front about a pairing policy. I would have no problem if I call the course to book a 2 on a Saturday morning, and the pro says "I'm going to try to get 2 more guys to pair up with you", as long as it's all done in a civilized and friendly manner (which trust me is definitely not always the case).

At the same time, if that's the course policy, they should then be consistent, and ALWAYS maximize the revenue. I've asked, I've called courses and asked about a 3 that they could pair me up with, and the answer is always no can't do that to the 3. I don't understand how a single should always accept being paired up, but it's not fair to put a single with an already booked 3. There's definitely a double standard there. 

Mitch747


Though golf is not a team game in normal situations, it was set up to be social the number of players of four was randomely chosen since that would allow players to play at a moderate pace. Not slow, not rushing. Singles and 2-somes are not conducive to this pace. The privelige of playing through is given only if the the course ahead is open. I am a social player and I play better with others (if I make a good shot I want someone to see it). You need witnesses for a hole-n-one.

andrew f


People are so self-concious about their golf game and get really nervous and rush their shots when they don't have to. So they would rather play by themselves. People also do not like to be shown up. That and being in groups can take a lot longer.

Josh G


andrew f

People are so self-concious about their golf game and get really nervous and rush their shots when they don't have to. So they would rather play by themselves. People also do not like to be shown up. That and being in groups can take a lot longer.

I still get nervous on the first tee, but I remember something my grandpa said, "even the pros embarrass themselves from time to time, and this is their job". Golf is about fun, and since we're paying to play we minus well enjoy the company and be thankful we get to play this great game

Mitch747


I know that everyone cant play during the week. Maybe they could consider playing later in the day instead of morning primetime week-end.

Daniel Rimmelzwaan


I will go a long way with you about 1's or 2's complaining about pace of play. My first reaction would also be "well what do you expect on a Saturday morning", and I totally agree that 1's or 2's have no leg to stand on as long as groups are keeping up with the ones in front of them. However, if a 4 has 10 minute search parties on every hole, or they all take turns plumbobbing 50 foot army-golf putts, things do get backed up, and you see huge gaps in front of slow groups like that. In that case I think it is not unreasonable to expect the ranger to take action. Whether the affected group is a 1, 2, 3 or 4 again has nothing to do with the actual problem.

Whether you play as a 1, 2, 3 or 4, you always play ready golf as much as possible, and if the group ahead is slower, you adjust your pace accordingly. Sometimes we play an extra ball, or practice bunker shots, or putt out from different places on the green while they are teeing off. To me it's about being outside, catching up with a friend, doing something that takes my mind off everything else. As long as everything moves along at whatever the pace may be that day, there is nothing to complain about. Even if it turns out to be a 5 or 6 hour round, I am having a great time. This is how I approach golf whether I play as a 1, 2, 3 or 4. 

The only time that this turns into a problem is when the group ahead of me is relatively slow, and the group behind me catches up (which can happen whether you play as a 1, 2, 3 or 4). At first you can pick up the pace a little, not play the extra ball, not make an extra putt, but at some point you are taking your shots as quickly as you can, but you can't go any faster because of the group ahead of you. Now all of a sudden you have the guys behind playing shots into you, so you hustle to get out of their way, and the guys in front of you are agitated because you are "pushing them". More often than not this will have the exact opposite effect, and they will deliberately take MORE time just to get even.

From the perspective of the guys ahead of me it does look like you are pushing them, so they will call the ranger. Ranger then comes to us and tells us to back off. While the ranger is talking to us, the guys behind stop hitting into us, so the ranger doesn't see that this is going on. Ranger then goes to the group behind, and they talk about the "loser single/pair" screwing up the whole golf experience for everyone. All the while the only thing that actually caused the problem is the difference between the pace of the group ahead and the group behind. The size of the group that I am playing in simply has NOTHING to do with the actual problem. If I had been in a 4, you would have had 2 4's with the same complaints, only you would not have the single to point a finger at.

To me this "problem" is simply not caused by whether 1's or 2's are playing. I'm sure that there's lots of 1's and 2's out there that are not so nice to have on the course, but there are just as many obnoxious 4's. Believe me there is a lot of unwarranted negativity and outright aggression against 1's and 2's. We could have discussions about what causes pace of play issues all day long, but I do not agree that 1's or 2's are the cause at all.

Daniel Rimmelzwaan


Mitch747
I know that everyone cant play during the week. Maybe they could consider playing later in the day instead of morning primetime week-end.

During hot summer days, when it's barely bearable high 80s in the morning and stifling hot 100s in the afternoon, I am not going to play the afternoon just because the starter doesn't approve that I like playing by myself or that I can only find one other person to play golf with that day.