Returning to the game after leaving with a terrible slice

Recently I decided to get back in the game. I had stopped playing, over fifteen years ago, because the game became more stressful than enjoyable after acquiring a terrible slice (the ball literally would travel directly to the right). After a decent amount of homework I decided it would be helpful to purchase regular shafts and a higher lofted driver and woods. So far I have purchased a used set of Titleist oversized + black irons and a Titleist 980F Strong 15° 3 wood (all with regular shafts). I also added a vokey sand wedge (chipping and putting were never an issue). I am currently working on purchasing a high lofted driver (ideally I want to find one with 12° or 12.5° loft) and a five wood. I have watched a number of youtube videos on correcting slices, correct grip and form. My plan is to start off at the driving range working on my swing (starting with my higher clubs and working my way down as I can hit them squarely). After I have straightened out my technique the plan is to ease back by only playing nine holes at a time on a par 3 course (leaving 18 holes and higher par courses for the distant future after I have completely conquered this slice). Has anyone else encountered similar struggles with a bad slice? How did you cure it? Are there any pros on here who can suggest how many hours of practice I will need to log to see improvement? Any tweaks to my plan or advice that anyone can offer would be welcomed. Thanks

A slice is a hard thing to fix because what you feel like you are doing and what you are actually doing could be pretty different.

I am not a pro, far from it, but fixing your slice may not take hours of practice, but simply a breakthrough moment when you realize how the correct swing path should feel.

Make sure your swing starts from your lower body. Rotate your hips, but your back should still be facing your target. Do not allow the club head to pass the center of your chest until after impact and hit the ball like you intend to do a slight push path.

About 70% of golfers battle a slice so you are not alone.  My advice would be to take some lessons with a PGA pro if you can.

One advantage from 15 yeas ago are the apps available that someone can cut a video of your swing from facing and behind.  The most common is swinging outside in, and there is more than one reason for that.  Titleist has one for I-products that is free.  Seeing a reverse tilt in action helped me do a better job of weight transfer back before starting forward  Overswinging with too much arm action out of sequence provides opportunities to go both ways.  Good luck in search of fairways. . 

I used to have a horrible slice and it almost turned me away from the game. I took the time to fix the issue and work on making a good swing and not coming over the top. Slicing the ball is just opening the club face at impact. WOrk on closing the club face and getting your wrist to turn faster.

Thanks, I'll try recording a video. That is an excellent idea. I do that for my niece with her gymnastics yet the idea of recording myself somehow slipped my mind. 

This past weekend it was finally warm enough to set the net up in the yard and do some practicing on my swing. I made a slight adjustment to my grip. I use an interlocking grip and my thumb was pointed towards noon instead of one o'clock. I also worked on adding more of a trunk twist to get power from my waist and loosened/relaxed my swing (I was holding my left elbow too straight). The adjustments along with switching to Titleist clubs (oversized irons, regular flex, and higher lofts) have appeared to correct my issues. I suppose I won't know for certain until I get out on the range but the ball was traveling dead center into the net. Thanks everyone who gave advice

Almost forgot, I also was centering the ball with every club and made the adjustment of moving the ball further up as the club number lowered. Basically I was doing nearly everything wrong with my form but now I am excited to get back to playing and enjoying the game. Again thanks for the advice